Posted by: Democratic Thinker | February 16, 2015

Joseph Warren—To Samuel Adams (June 15, 1774)

Background of the American Revolution

 
 

A few months after the Boston Tea Party, Joseph Warren writes to Samuel Adams.


If the timidity of some and the treachery of others in this town do not ruin us, I think we shall be saved. I fear New York will not assist us with a very good grace; but she may perhaps be ashamed to desert us: at least, if her MERCHANTS offer to sell us, her MECHANICS will forbid the auction..

To Samuel Adams.

—————

BOSTON, June 15, 1774.

SIR,—

Joseph Warren.

THIS afternoon was a meeting of a considerable number of the tradesmen of this town; but, after some altercations, they dissolved themselves without coming to any resolutions, for which I am very sorry, as we had some expectations from the meeting. We are industrious to save our country, but not more so than others are to destroy it. The party who are for paying for the tea, and by that making a way for every compliance, are too formidable. However, we have endeavored to convince friends of the impolicy of giving way in any single article, as the arguments for a total submission will certainly gain strength by our having sacrificed such a sum as they demand for the payment of the tea. I think your attendance can by no means be dispensed with next Friday. I believe we shall have a warm engagement. The committee had a letter laid before them this evening, from Baltimore, which more comports with my sentiments of public affairs than any yet received from the southward. That letter, with several others to you, will be forwarded in the morning. Vigilance, activity, and patience are necessary at this time: but the mistress we court is LIBERTY; and it is better to die than not to obtain her. If the timidity of some and the treachery of others in this town does not ruin us, I think we shall be saved. I fear New York will not assist us with a very good grace; but she may perhaps be ashamed to desert us: at least, if her MERCHANTS offer to sell us, her MECHANICS will forbid the auction. You will undoubtedly do all in your power to effect the relief of this town, and to expedite a general congress; but we must not suffer the town of Boston to render themselves contemptible, either by their want of fortitude, honesty, or foresight, in the eyes of this and the other colonies.

I beg you will not fail to bring with you all such papers and letters as may serve our righteous cause at our meeting Friday.

I am, dear sir, with great respect, yr. H. sevt.,

J. WARREN.

Mr. S. ADAMS, at Salem.

P.S. — I think religion and policy require that a day be set apart for publicly addressing the King of kings.

A tip o’ the hat to Dr. Joseph Warren on the Web.

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