Posted by: Democratic Thinker | July 8, 2014

Weekly Story: Parents, Keep a Steady Hand

Weekly Story

 
Charles Miner, a pioneer Pennslvania editor, observes his neighbors.



Parents, Keep a Steady Hand.

Essay from the Desk of Poor Robert the Scribe.

—————

If your children you’d command
Parents, keep a steady hand.

OUR parson used to say, “Just as the twig is bent the tree’s inclined,” and therefore every little fellow of us—rag-tag and bobtail—used to be obliged to say our chatechism every Saturday afternoon. And methinks I can trace the influence of the serious lessons in the conduct and opinions of every man who was brought up under the venerable pastor.

The government as well as education of children is a matter of the most momentuous concern.

Mrs. Hasty is as good a dispositioned woman as you will find in an hundred, but she “dont keep a steady hand” with her children. Tommy, said she, let that clock case alone. Tommy turned round, whistled for half a minute, and went to work at the clock again. Tommy, said she angrily, if you dont let that clock alone I certainly will whip you. I never did see such a boy, said the mother, he dont mind a word I say. She continued her knitting while Tom continued at the clock case till over it tumbled and dashed the clock and case to pieces. The mother up with the tongs and knocked poor Tomb sprawling among the ruins. Tom roared like Bedlam, and the kind woman took him up in her lap—was sorry she had hurt him, but then he should learn to mind his mother, and giving him a piece of cake to stop his crying picked up the ruins of the clock. What was the consequence? Why, Tom, who with “a steady hand” to govern him, would have became a man of worth, turned out a hasty, ill-natured villain.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | July 7, 2014

Isaac Watts: Logic

Western Thought

 
 
In 1724 Isaac Watts publishes the standard treatise on the study of Logic. In the introduction he defines the purpose and organization of his study.

Reason as to the Power and Principle of it, is the common Gift of God to all Men; tho’ all are not favoured with it by Nature in an equal Degree.

LOGICK:
OR,
The Right Use of REASON.
IN THE
ENQUIRY after TRUTH.

—————

The INTRODUCTION and general SCHEME.

 

LOGICK is the Art of using Reason* well in our Enquiries after Truths and the Communication of it to others.

Reason* is the Glory of human Nature, and one of the chief Eminencies whereby we are raised above our Fellow-creatures the Brutes in this lower World.

* The Word Reason in this Place is not confined to the mere Faculty of reasoning or inferring one thing from another, but includes all the intellectual Powers of Man.

Reason as to the Power and Principle of it, is the common Gift of God to all Men; tho’ all are not favoured with it by Nature in an equal Degree: But the acquired Improvement of it in different Men, make a much greater Distinction between them than Nature had made. I could even venture to say, that the Improvement of Reason hath raised the Learned and the Prudent in the European World, almost as much above the Hottentots, and other Savages of Africa, as those Savages are by Nature superior to the Birds, the Beasts, and the Fishes.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | July 5, 2014

The Lord’s Blessing

Considerations by the Way

 
 
An ancient instructor is instructed.


We shall not presume to anticipate the judgment of our fellow-citizens throughout the Union on these important letters, by interposing any comments of our own.—Four Letters on the Important Subject of Government, 1802.


 

Aaron, Say Unto Them …

 

The Lord’s Blessing.

—————

AND the LORD spake unto Moses, saying,

Speak unto Aaron and unto his sons, saying, On this wise ye shall bless the children of Israel, saying unto them,

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | July 1, 2014

Weekly Story: Washington’s Farewell to his Mother

Weekly Story

 
 
George Washington’s adopted son recalls President-elect Washington’s visit with his mother.


“But go, George, fulfil the high destinies which Heaven appears to have intended you; go, my son, and may that Heaven’s and your mother’s blessing be with you always.”


 

 

Washington’s Farewell to His Mother.

—————

 

IMMEDIATELY after the organization of the present government [spring of 1789], the Chief Magistrate repaired to Fredericksburg, to pay his humble duty to his mother, preparatory to his departure for New York. An affecting scene ensued. The son feelingly remarked the ravages which a torturing disease had made upon the aged frame of the mother, and addressed her thus:

“The people, madam, have been pleased, with the most flattering unanimity, to elect me to the chief magistracy of these United States, but before I can assume the functions of my office, I have come to bid you an affectionate farewell. So soon as the weight of public business, which must necessarily attend the outset of a new government, can be disposed of, I shall hasten to Virginia, and—”

Here the matron interrupted with—“and you will see me no more; my great age, and the disease which is fast approaching my vitals, warn me that I shall not be long in this world; I trust in God that I may be somewhat prepared for a better. But go, George, fulfil the high destinies which Heaven appears to have intended you; go, my son, and may that Heaven’s and your mother’s blessing be with you always.”

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 30, 2014

Clay—To Richard Pindell (February 17, 1849)

American Correspondence

 
 
Henry Clay—a strong Unionist—documents his plan for ridding Kentucky of slavery.


I am aware that there are respectable persons who believe that slavery is a blessing, that the institution ought to exist in every well organized society, and that it is even favorable to the preservation of liberty. Happily, the number who entertain these extravagant opinions is not very great, and the time would be uselessly occupied in an elaborate refutation of them.


 

TO RICHARD PINDELL, ESQ.

—————

NEW ORLEANS, February 17th, 1849.

DEAR SIR

PRIOR to my departure from home in December last, in behalf of yourself and other friends, you obtained from me a promise to make a public exposition of my views and opinions upon a grave and important question which, it was then anticipated, would be much debated and considered by the people of Kentucky, during this year, in consequence of the approaching Convention, summoned to amend their present Constitution. I was not entirely well when I left home, and owing to that cause, and my confinement several weeks, during my sojourn in this city, from the effects of an accident which befell me, I have been delayed in the fulfillment of my promise, which I now proceed to execute.

The question, to which I allude, is whether African slavery, as it now exists in Kentucky, shall be left to a perpetual or indefinite continuance, or some provision shall be made in the new Constitution, for its gradual and ultimate extinction?

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 29, 2014

Sacrafice—Sacrament—Ritual

Considerations by the Way

 
 
An ancient philosopher asks and answers.


We shall not presume to anticipate the judgment of our fellow-citizens throughout the Union on these important letters, by interposing any comments of our own.—Four Letters on the Important Subject of Government, 1802.


 

 

Sacrifice—Sacrament—Ritual.

—————

HEAR ye now what the LORD saith; Arise, contend thou before the mountains, and let the hills hear thy voice.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 28, 2014

Clay: On The Greek Revolution

American Debate

 
 
At the beginning of 1824—amidist the Greek nation’s attempts to throw off their Mohammedan conquerors—Representative Henry Clay rises to speak.


Sir, the committee has been attempted to be alarmed by the dangers to our commerce in the Mediterranean; and a wretched invoice of figs and opium has been spread before us to repress our sensibilities and to eradicate our humanity. Ah! sir, “what shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul,” or what shall it avail a nation to save the whole of a miserable trade, and lose its liberties?

ON THE GREEK REVOLUTION.

—————

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 20, 1824.

The resolution of Mr. Webster, looking to a recognition of the Independence of Greece, and making an appropriation to send thither a Political Agent, with the amendment of Mr. Poinsett, disclaiming such recognition, but proposing instead a declaration of the sympathy of the United States with the Greeks in their struggle for Independence, being under consideration, Mr. Clay said:

IN rising, let me state distinctly the substance of the original proposition of the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Webster), with that of the amendment of the gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Poinsett). The resolution proposes a provision of the means to defray the expense of deputing a commissioner or agent to Greece, whenever the President, who knows, or ought to know, the disposition of all the European powers, Turkish or Christian, shall deem it proper. The amendment goes to withhold any appropriation to that object, but to make a public declaration of our sympathy with the Greeks, and of our good wishes for the success of their cause. And how has this simple, unpretending, unambitious, this harmless proposition, been treated in debate? It has been argued as if it offered aid to the Greeks; as if it proposed the recognition of the independence of their government; as a measure of unjustifiable interference in the internal affairs of a foreign state, and finally, as war. And they who thus argue the question, whilst they absolutely surrender themselves to the illusions of their own fervid imaginations, and depict, in glowing terms, the monstrous and alarming consequences which are to spring out of a proposition so simple, impute to us, who are its humble advocates, quixotism, quixotism! Whilst they are taking the most extravagant and boundless range, and arguing anything and everything but the question before the Committee, they accuse us of enthusiasm, of giving the reins to excited feeling, of being transported by our imaginations. No, sir, the resolution is no proposition for aid, nor for recognition, nor for interference, nor for war.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 27, 2014

To a Mouse

 

 

To a Mouse.

—————

On turning her up in her nest, with the plough,
November
, 1785.

WEE, sleekit, cow’rin’, tim’rous beastie,
0 what a panic’s in thy breastie!
Thou need na start awa sae hasty,
Wi’ bickering brattle!
I wad be laith to rin an’ chase thee
Wi’ murd’ring pattle!

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 25, 2014

Weekly Story: The First Camp Meeting (M.E.)

Weekly Story

 
 
A Methodist Episcopal evangelist relates the history of the first ever camp meetings held at the turn of the Nineteenth Century.


The practice of encamping for religious meetings, however, being thus introduced, it was soon reduced to a regular system, and adopted as a powerful means of promoting the work of God.


 

 

CAMP MEETING MANUAL.
CHAPTER I.
HISTORY.

—————

 

Methodism a child of Providence—Camp Meetings—Originated in Kentucky—The McGee’s—A Sacramental Service among the Presbyterians—Wonderful outpouring of the Spirit—First Camp Meetings appointed—Their size—Philosophy of their success.

METHODISM, as a distinct ecclesiastical system, is a child of Providence. The history of each of her peculiar institutions and customs indicates it. Episcopal oversight, General and Annual Conferences, Presiding Elderships, Watch Nights, Love Feasts and Class Meetings, have each a history, interesting in itself, and well adapted to illustrate to what far reaching and beneficent results God leads the counsels of humble men, who, while ignorant of the future, aim only at the Divine glory in the present moment.

The introduction of Camp Meetings, and their subsequent very general adoption, as a special means of grace, by the Methodists of the United States, are to be reckoned among the instances in which the course of the Church has been shaped by the providential indications of the will of God.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 25, 2014

Weekly Story: The First Camp Meeting (Presby.)

Weekly Story

 
 
A Presbyterian minister relates the history of the first ever camp meetings held at the turn of the Nineteenth Century.


Much opposition was manifested to the revival from its first commencement, and what is worthy of remark, its most violent opposers were avowed Deists, and professors of religion.


 

 

The First Camp Meeting.

—————

 

THE FIRST CAMP MEETING IN CHRISTENDOM was held in July, at the Gasper River Church. It is worthy of remark, that the gracious work first commenced in this church, and although the other two congregations had been blessed with times of awakening and refreshing; yet the effect of them had been, in a great measure confined to their immediate vicinities: but from this congregation, and from the first camp meeting, the revival spirit went forth, which diffused itself throughout the churches of the West, and resulted in the conversion of thousands of immortal souls, and caused its influence to be felt not only in the valley of the Mississippi, but also on the coast of the Atlantic, particularly in the Carolina?

The influence of camp meetings on the inhabitants of the western country has been immense, thousands, and tens of thousands, on these occasions have professed to pass from death unto life. Meetings of this nature are now held in almost all parts of the United States, and by different denominations. They have been held for years by a certain class of Methodists in England; and an attempt has been made to introduce them into Scotland, and in the vicinity of Edinburgh its capital. But, very few are acquainted with their origin, which has been traced to various causes, by curious speculators on the subject. Although it is true that the Jews on many occasions, held such convocations; and multitudes assembled’ in the wilderness, where they remained for days, hearing the heavenly discourses of Him, who spake as never man spake: yet in these latter days, such meetings were not in use until they were introduced by Mr. M’Gready.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 24, 2014

Œconomick—Index

Œconomick—Xenophon

 

 
 
Xenophon—a student of Socrates—writes the first work on the study of economics.

Œconomick.

A Treatise
On The
Management of an Estate and a Household.

INDEX.

—————


 

Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 24, 2014

Xenophon—Œconomick: IV

Western Thought

 
 
 
Xenophon—a student of Socrates—writes the first work on the study of economics.

But I do not pretend that it can be learnt by barely looking on, or hearing it once repeated: On the contrary, I say it cannot be attained but by Study and Instruction, nor without a natural Dispositions nor unless a Man be qualified for it from above.

Œconomick.

A Treatise
On The
Management of an Estate and a Household.

IIII. Ischomachus—Agriculture.

—————

AGRICULTURE, said he, Socrates, is not so hard to learn as the other Arts; which take up many Years of the Learner’s Life, before he can practise them so as to get a Livelihood by them: But partly by looking upon the Labourers, partly by Instructions by Word of Mouth, you may soon know enough of Agriculture to teach it to another, if you please. And I believe you are not ignorant, That you already know a great deal of it. Now all other Artists take Delight to conceal, in some Measure, the Secrets of their Art: But a peasant, who is skillful in Planting, is pleased to have Lookers-on: And so is he who sows the Corn as he ought: And if you examine him concerning any Thing that seems to be well done; he will hide nothing from you of the Method he observed in doing it: And thus, Socrates, in regard even to Civility, Agriculture seems to make those who follow that Occupation, better-mannered, and more frank and open-hearted than others.

You begin, said I, by an Introduction so alluring, as will charm your Hearers to Attention: And because it is honourable to learn it, be you the more willing to teach me: Nor will your Instructions be any ways dishonourable to you; though indeed it is a great Shame in me, to be ignorant of these Affairs; especially since they are so useful.

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Posted by: Democratic Thinker | June 23, 2014

Xenophon—Œconomick: III

Western Thought

 
 
 
Xenophon—a student of Socrates—writes the first work on the study of economics.

I cannot exempt myself from the Calumnies of many of my Countrymen: Though you perhaps thought I would say, that I was upon these Accounts, called an honest and good Man.

Œconomick.

A Treatise
On The
Management of an Estate and a Household.

III. Ischomachus—Management Without Doors.

—————

I THEN told him, I thought I had heard enough of the Admonitions he had given his Wife, and of her Way of Living, which were highly to be commended in both of them: Now, said I, Ischomachus, let me know about what you imployed yourself as Master of the Family. I presume it will not be ungrateful to you to relate to me those Actions, that have justly acquired you so great Esteem: And I for my Part shall think myself extreamly obliged to you, if you will let me hear from your own Mouth, how you have behaved yourself, to have every where gained the character of a good and honest Man.

I will very willingly, said he, Socrates, tell you what have been my constant Imployments, to the End that if you find any Thing amiss in my past Course of Life, I may be able by the Advices you shall give me, to amend it for the future.

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